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Drama and Movies

Daejanggeum [2003, MBC] Based loosely on a historical figure depicted in the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, the show focuses on Jang-geum, Korea's first female royal physician
Daejanggeum [2003, MBC] Based loosely on a historical figure depicted in the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, the show focuses on Jang-geum, Korea's first female royal physician
While music and dance play an integral role in all traditional theatrical performances, Korean drama has its origins in prehistoric religious rites.

A good example of this classical theatrical form is the masked dance Sandaenori, a combination of dance, song and narrative punctuated with satire and humor. Slightly varying from one region to another in terms of style, dialogue and costume, it enjoyed remarkable popularity among rural people up to the early 20th century.

Pansori and the shamanistic ritual known as a gut were other forms of sacred theater that appealed to the populace. All of these are still performed in modern Korea, though not very often.

There are a few institutions that offer various performing arts in one place, one example being Jeong-dong Theater in central Seoul. It presents a traditional performing arts series, drama and music.
 
Winter Sonata [2002, KBS] was aired on Japan's NHK and helped spark the Hallyu Wave [Korean pop culture] that has swept Japan and Asia
Winter Sonata [2002, KBS] was aired on Japan's NHK and helped spark the Hallyu Wave [Korean pop culture] that has swept Japan and Asia
The first performance of singeuk (new drama), a departure from the masked dance and other forms of traditional dramas, was presented in December 1902. However, modern drama began to take firm root in the 1910s after the first Western-style theater was opened in Seoul in 1908. The theater named Wongaksa was in operation until November 1909.

Theatrical groups Hyeoksindan and Munsuseong were also organized by those who returned from study in Japan and staged sinpa (new wave) dramas. Sinpa was a concept that countered gupa (old wave) drama, meaning kabuki of Japan. Sinpa dramas first dealt with political and military themes and then were diversified into detective stories, soap operas and tragedies.

While sinpa dramas proved to be a passing fad, a genuine new wave of dramas was promoted by artists who rallied around Wongaksa and raised the curtain of modern drama. In 1922, Towolhoe, a coterie of theatrical figures, was formed, and led the drama movement across the country, staging as many as 87 performances. Drama remained popular until the 1930s, but then subsided in the socio-political turmoil of the 1940s and 1950s. In the following decade, it was further weakened amidst the boom of motion pictures and the emergence of television.

Old Boy [2003, directed by Park Chan-wook] Old Boy is the twisted tale of a man imprioned for 15 years without any explanation. The film won the Grand Prix from the Cannes Film Festival jury in 2004.
Old Boy [2003, directed by Park Chan-wook] Old Boy is the twisted tale of a man imprioned for 15 years without any explanation. The film won the Grand Prix from the Cannes Film Festival jury in 2004.
In the 1970s, a number of young artists began to study and adopt the styles and themes of traditional theatrical works like the masked dance plays, shaman rituals and pansori. The Korean Culture and Arts Foundation has been sponsoring an annual drama festival to encourage local theatrical performances. At present, a great number of theatrical groups are active around the year, featuring all manners of genres from comedy to historical epics at small theaters along Daehangno Street in downtown Seoul. Some theatrical performances become very successful and are staged for extended runs.

The first Korean-made film was shown to the public in 1919. Entitled “Righteous Revenge,” it was a so-called kino-drama designed to be combined with a stage performance. The first feature film, “Oath Under the Moon,” was screened in 1923. In 1926, charismatic actor-director Na Un-gyu drew an enthusiastic response from the public by producing “Arirang,” a cinematic protest against Japanese oppression.

After the Korean War in 1953, the local film industry grew gradually and enjoyed a booming business for about a decade. But the next two decades saw a stagnation of the industry due largely to the rapid growth of television. Since the early 1980s, however, the film industry has regained some vitality thanks mainly to a few talented young directors who boldly discarded old stereotypes in movie making.

Secret Sunshine [2007, directed by Lee Chang-dong] The story centers around a lady that copes with the death of her husband and child. Jeon Do-yeon won the Best Actress Prize in the 2007 Cannes Film Festival.
Secret Sunshine [2007, directed by Lee Chang-dong] The story centers around a lady that copes with the death of her husband and child. Jeon Do-yeon won the Best Actress Prize in the 2007 Cannes Film Festival.
Their efforts succeeded and their movies have earned recognition at various international festivals including Cannes, Chicago, Berlin, Venice, London, Tokyo, Moscow and other cities. This positive trend has accelerated with more and more directors producing movies based on uniquely Korean stories that have moved hearts worldwide.

In 2000, “Chunhyangjeon” (The Story of Chunhyang), directed by Im Kwon-taek, became the first Korean film to compete in the Cannes Film Festival. Four other films were screened in non-competitive categories. The film “Seom” (Island), directed by Kim Ki-duk, competed in the Venice International Film Festival.

Following these films, in 2001, “Joint Security Area” was selected to compete in the Berlin International Film Festival and another film by Kim Ki-duk, “Address Unknown” entered the competition section of the Venice International Film Festival.

Director Park Chan-wook garnered the Jury Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival in 2004 for his film “Old Boy.” He also won the Best Director Award at the Bangkok International Film Festival for “Old Boy” in 2005 and “Sympathy for Lady Vengeance” in 2006.

Public interest in films has been mounting and several international film festivals have been staged by provincial governments or private organizations in Korea.

JUMP, the spectacular Martial Arts Performance won the Comedy Award at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival 2006 and performed before Prince Charles and the BBC at The Royal Variety Performance.
JUMP, the spectacular Martial Arts Performance won the Comedy Award at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival 2006 and performed before Prince Charles and the BBC at The Royal Variety Performance.
They include the Pusan International Film Festival, the Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival, the Jeonju International Film Festival and the Women's Film Festival in Seoul.

As in other countries, Korean cinema circles are seeing a noticeable expansion of the animation and cartoon industry. More than 200 companies are producing works in this rising genre.

The film, video, animation and online content industries are also undergoing a boom in Korea, fueled by the availability of high-speed Internet services.

In 2007, following steep reductions in the screen quota system the previous year, 392 feature films were screened in Korea, a 60 percent increase over 2003. Nearly 30 percent, or 112 of these, were Korean productions.

 
 

  Korean Culture Information  
   Overview

The geography of Korea -- a peninsula jutting out from the world's largest continent -- has contributed greatly to the development of uniquely Korean characteristics. The foundation for the country's culture and arts is the Korean identity: a combination of traits associated with continental and island peoples. Throughout many millennia, Korea has interacted with the predominant continental cultures of Asia despite its peripheral location in the northeast. Remarkably, while accommodating major religions and traditions of other Asian regions, the country …

   UNESCO Treasures in Korea
World Heritage The majestic entrance to Bulguksa Temple UNESCO has recognized the unique value and the distinct character of Korean culture by placing a number of Korean treasures on the World Heritage List. In 1995, UNESCO added to its list Bulguksa Temple and Seokguram Grotto, both in Gyeongju, Gyeongsangbuk-do (North Gyeongsang Province); Haeinsa Temple Janggyeongpanjeon, the depositories for the Tripitaka Koreana Woodblocks in Gy…
   Fine Arts
Though people started living on the Korean Peninsula in the Paleolithic Age, existing remains indicate that the origin of fine arts dates back to the Neolithic Age (c. 6,000-1,000 B.C.). Rock carvings on a riverside cliff named Ban-gudae in Ulsan on the southeast coast feature vivid descriptions of animals and are noteworthy art from the prehistoric age. The aesthetic sense of this era can also be found in the comb and eggplant pattern on pottery for daily…
   Literature
Yongbieocheonga: The work eulogizes the virtue of the ancestors for the House of Yi, the founding family of the Joseon Dynasty, likening them to a deep rooted tree and a spring of deep waters Korean literature is usually divided chronologically into classical and modern periods. Korea's classical literature developed against the backdrop of traditional folk beliefs. It was also influenced by Taoism, Con…
   Painting
The figures on the walls of Muyongchong [the Tomb of the Dancers] from the Goguryeo Kingdom (37 B.C. - A.D. 668) Although Korean painters showed a certain level of accumulated skills from the time of the Three Kingdoms, most paintings have been lost because they were drawn on paper. As a result, it is only possible to appreciate a limited number of paintings from this age such as the tomb murals. In addition to the Goguryeo mural paintings…
   Music and Dance
Ensemble of national classical music performing Sujecheon [Long Life as Eternal as the Heavens] Music and dance were means of religious worship and this tradition continued through the Three Kingdoms period. More than 30 musical instruments were used during the Three Kingdoms period, and particularly noteworthy was the hyeonhakgeum (black crane zither), which Wang San-ak of Goguryeo created by altering…
   Drama and Movies
Daejanggeum [2003, MBC] Based loosely on a historical figure depicted in the Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, the show focuses on Jang-geum, Korea's first female royal physician While music and dance play an integral role in all traditional theatrical performances, Korean drama has its origins in prehistoric religious rites. A good example of this classical theatrical form is the masked dance Sandaenori,…
   Museums and Theaters
National Museum of Contemporary Art in Seoul Grand Park Korea abounds in cultural facilities of all levels and categories where people can enjoy exhibitions and stage performances throughout the year. These places offer an on-the-spot glimpse into the cultural and artistic achievements of Koreans past and present, regarding both traditional and modern trends and tastes. From internationally recognized museum…




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